Difference between revisions of "Explicit instruction"

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[[Category:PSLC General]]
 
[[Category:PSLC General]]
  
Explicit instruction is a systematic instructional approach that includes a set of delivery and design procedures derived from effective schools research merged with behavior analysis. There are two essential components to well designed explicit instruction: (a) visible delivery features are group instruction with a high level of teacher and student interactions, and (b) the less observable, instructional design principles and assumptions that make up the content and strategies to be taught.
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Explicit instruction is a systematic instructional approach that includes a set of delivery and design procedures derived from effective schools research merged with behavior analysis. There are two essential components to well designed explicit instruction: (a) visible delivery features are group instruction with a high level of teacher and student interactions, and (b) the less observable, instructional design principles and assumptions that make up the content and [[strategies]] to be taught.
  
 
By Tracey Hall, Ph.D., Senior Research Scientist, NCAC
 
By Tracey Hall, Ph.D., Senior Research Scientist, NCAC
  
 
CAST Universal Design for Learning[http://www.cast.org/publications/ncac/ncac_explicit.html]
 
CAST Universal Design for Learning[http://www.cast.org/publications/ncac/ncac_explicit.html]

Revision as of 09:58, 27 December 2006


Explicit instruction is a systematic instructional approach that includes a set of delivery and design procedures derived from effective schools research merged with behavior analysis. There are two essential components to well designed explicit instruction: (a) visible delivery features are group instruction with a high level of teacher and student interactions, and (b) the less observable, instructional design principles and assumptions that make up the content and strategies to be taught.

By Tracey Hall, Ph.D., Senior Research Scientist, NCAC

CAST Universal Design for Learning[1]