Difference between revisions of "External representations"

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External representations consist of <P>
 
External representations consist of <P>
*(1) the represented world - the content of a representation (e.g., content of a weather map would be temperatures around the country)
+
*1. the represented world - the content of a representation (e.g., content of a weather map would be temperatures around the country)
*(2) the representing world - the format of the representation (e.g., temperatures can be represented by different colors in pictorial form, or by a table)
+
*2. the representing world - the format of the representation (e.g., temperatures can be represented by different colors in pictorial form, or by a table)
*(3) what aspects of the represented world are being represented (e.g., weather map may have states delineated, but not cities)  
+
*3. what aspects of the represented world are being represented (e.g., weather map may have states delineated, but not cities)  
*(4) what aspects of the representing world are doing the modelling (e.g. colors map to temperatures)
+
*4. what aspects of the representing world are doing the modelling (e.g. colors map to temperatures)
*(5) the correspondence between the two worlds (how the content is mapped to the format)
+
*5. the correspondence between the two worlds (how the content is mapped to the format)
  
 
(Palmer, 1977).
 
(Palmer, 1977).

Revision as of 13:05, 27 November 2006

External representations consist of

  • 1. the represented world - the content of a representation (e.g., content of a weather map would be temperatures around the country)
  • 2. the representing world - the format of the representation (e.g., temperatures can be represented by different colors in pictorial form, or by a table)
  • 3. what aspects of the represented world are being represented (e.g., weather map may have states delineated, but not cities)
  • 4. what aspects of the representing world are doing the modelling (e.g. colors map to temperatures)
  • 5. the correspondence between the two worlds (how the content is mapped to the format)
(Palmer, 1977).