Difference between revisions of "PSLC GradStudents"

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== Science of Learning Relevant Courses ==
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The PIER program offers three courses -- see the [www.cmu.edu/pier/ PIER web site].
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See also the courses taught be any of the PSLC faculty.
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(Please add the names of relevant courses and web pointers if possible!)

Revision as of 08:29, 25 August 2010

The purpose of this page is to serve as a repository of information relevant for grad students. We hope to maintain this page as a repository of current and relevant information for graduate students currently affiliated with the PSLC, as well as grad students who hope to be in the PSLC.

Announcements

Meeting Notes

FAQs

1. What does it take to be a PSLC grad student?

Well, there are basically three ways you can be considered a PSLC grad student. a. You work on a project that receives funding from the PSLC. b. Your advisor or collaborator receives funding from the PSLC and asks you to be involved. c. You want to be a PSLC grad student.


2. What types of opportunities does the PSLC have for a grad student like me?

There are a variety of different levels of involvement and types of activities that the PSLC offers.

For the casual grad student, the PSLC organizes a speaker series with talks that may be of interest to students interested in the learning sciences. These are open to whomever wishes to go. There are also monthly lunch meetings where people associated with the PSLC can give a talk on their work.

The grad student community also hopes to organize events catered toward grad students, with topics like applying for grants, finding jobs, collaboration with people at other universities, etc. These are also open to the public.

For those who wish to get more involved, the grad student community also has monthly meetings to discuss center-wide issues, read and discuss articles we believe are relevant, plan future events, etc. Again, these are open to the public.

Finally, each thrust has regular or semi-regular meetings to discuss the thrust's theoretical framework, set the research agenda, and discuss the progress of projects within that thrust. While these are open to anyone, they're probably of limited interest unless you currently have or have had a project affiliated with the thrust.


3. What is expected of me as a PSLC grad student?

If you receive funding from the PSLC, you are expected, to the extent it is possible, to attend the thrust meetings for your relevant thrust, and attend the monthly PSLC lunches. The grad student community also encourages you to come to the grad student monthly meetings, of course.

If you don't receive funding from the PSLC, but still wish to be a part of the grad student community, your level of involvement is up to you.


How do I find out about upcoming talks/meetings/events?

One option is to check the Announcements section of this page. A possibly better option would be to get on our mailing list. To do that, e-mail Jo Bodnar at jobodnar AT cs.cmu.edu and ask to be put on the PSLC general mailing list and grad student mailing list.

There is also a regularly updated calendar at our main webpage (learnlab.org) that is updated regularly and gives a fairly complete account of most PSLC events.


4. I already consider myself a PSLC grad, and want to be included on this page! What do I have to do?

Well the great thing about the wiki page is that anybody can update it whenever they want! So, if you have an account here, and you know how to edit tables, you can just log in and add yourself!

If you don't have an account already, you can easily request one (NOTE: I forget how to do it- I'll need to add that). Once you have an account, you can just click "Edit" above the table, and you can add yourself.


5. But that's such a pain! Isn't there an easier way?!

There sure is! If you don't want to make all that effort just to have your name and e-mail address on a page, just send your info to our Wikimaster (yep, we made that word up!), Ben Friedline, at bef25 AT pitt.edu, and he'll put it on here.

Who are the PSLC grads?

Grad Student Name University/Department Advisor E-mail Bio Personal Webpage PSLC Projects Other
Colleen Davy Carnegie Mellon/Psychology Brian MacWhinney cdavy1@andrew.cmu.edu I am interested in how adult second language learners develop fluent speaking skills in their second language. Spanish Sentence Production

Science of Learning Relevant Courses

The PIER program offers three courses -- see the [www.cmu.edu/pier/ PIER web site].

See also the courses taught be any of the PSLC faculty.

(Please add the names of relevant courses and web pointers if possible!)