Difference between revisions of "Think-aloud data"

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* Ericsson, K. A., & Simon, H. A. (1980). Verbal reports as data. ''Psychological Review, 87''(3), 215-251.
 
* Ericsson, K. A., & Simon, H. A. (1980). Verbal reports as data. ''Psychological Review, 87''(3), 215-251.
 
* M. W. van Someren, Y. Barnard, J. A.C. Sandberg (1994) [http://www.eurisco.org/pdf/Think-aloud-method.pdf The Think Aloud Method: A practical guide to modelling cognitive processes], Academic Press, London, 1994.
 
* M. W. van Someren, Y. Barnard, J. A.C. Sandberg (1994) [http://www.eurisco.org/pdf/Think-aloud-method.pdf The Think Aloud Method: A practical guide to modelling cognitive processes], Academic Press, London, 1994.
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[[Category:Glossary]]

Revision as of 18:24, 15 February 2007

When students do an activity, such as solving a problem, the experimenter can ask them to "think aloud" as they work and record their speech. Usually, this is done by running Camtasia or some other screen-capture recording system so that the analyst can see what the students are talking about and doing. Speech quality is often better if students wear close-talk headset mikes.

There was once considerable controversy about whether think-aloud data collection affected students' cognition. After many experiments comparing performance with and without such data collection, the answer is "it depends" on what the activity is. See